Last edited by Vutilar
Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

4 edition of Plants Used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa found in the catalog.

Plants Used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa

James E. Meeker

Plants Used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa

by James E. Meeker

  • 223 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Great Lakes Indian Fish & .
Written in English


The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL11742622M
ISBN 100966582012
ISBN 109780966582017

Ojibwa were encouraged to move off reservations to assimilate with non-Native culture in urban areas in order to reduce the need for federal support. Great Lakes Ojibwa moved to urban centers in Minnesota and Wisconsin, most notably Duluth, Milwaukee, and Minneapolis, St. Paul. Meeker JE, Elias JE, Heim JA: Plants used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa. , Odanah, Wisconsin: Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission; Isaiah Brokenleg, Sicangu Lakota. Walking Toward the Sacred: Our Great Lakes Tobacco Story. Director of the Communities Putting Prevention to Work Project at Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council.

Plants used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa. Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission: Odanah, WI. pp. [ISBN ]. Newcomb, Lawrence. Newcomb’s wildflower guide. Little, Brown and Company: Boston, MA. pp. [ISBN ]. The Great Lakes region of North America is a bi-national Canadian–American region that includes portions of the eight U.S. states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin as well as the Canadian province of Ontario. Quebec is at times included as part of the region because, although it is not in a Great Lake watershed, it is in the Largest metropolitan areas: Greater Chicago, .

HUMN Oct. 7, The Ojibwa Indians. Introduction/General Information. The Ojibwa Indians, who make up one of the largest tribal groups in North America today, are considered the largest and most powerful of the Great Lakes tribes that existed, yet few people realize the significance of the Ojibwa in history. Historically the Great Lakes were home to many indigenous bands, including the Ojibwa, Ottawa, Huron, Iroquois, Potawatomi, and Menominee. 8 Despite the differing practices among these and other bands of the Great Lakes, they all share basic healing rituals including ingestion of herbal remedies, topical application of plants, drinking Author: Fidji Gendron, Rita Karana, Lisa Danielle Cyr, Maria Pontes Ferreira.


Share this book
You might also like
Problems of education in Pakistan

Problems of education in Pakistan

Pulleys (Simple Machines)

Pulleys (Simple Machines)

Accounting problems of multinational enterprises

Accounting problems of multinational enterprises

Forward Oregon, roads in a new context

Forward Oregon, roads in a new context

U.S. private saving and the tax treatment of IRA/401(k)s

U.S. private saving and the tax treatment of IRA/401(k)s

Red Biddy, and other stories.

Red Biddy, and other stories.

Batsford guide to vintage cars

Batsford guide to vintage cars

The Competition Act 1998

The Competition Act 1998

The new town idea

The new town idea

Rose Finn-Kelcey.

Rose Finn-Kelcey.

Law and order

Law and order

Catalog of manuscripts in the American Philosophical Society Library, including the archival shelflist.

Catalog of manuscripts in the American Philosophical Society Library, including the archival shelflist.

The Balkan Peninsula

The Balkan Peninsula

Faces and facets

Faces and facets

album Oz

album Oz

Plants Used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa by James E. Meeker Download PDF EPUB FB2

Plants Used By The Great Lakes Ojibwa book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Available in unabridged and abridged versions, this /5(9). Plants Used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa [Meeker, James E., Elias, Joan E., Heim, John A.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Plants Used by the Great Lakes OjibwaBrand: James E.

Meeker. Get this from a library. Plants used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa. [James E Meeker; Joan E Elias; John A Heim; Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission.] -- "This book includes a brief description of plants and their use, reproduced line drawings, and a map showing approximately where each plant is distributed within the ceded territories." Plants Used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa $ This book includes a brief description of the plant and it's use, a reproduced line drawing, and a map showing approximately where each plant is distributed within the ceded territories.

The abridged version is much the same but without the drawings, maps and descriptions. Plants Used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa [Print Replica] Kindle Edition by Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (Author), James Meeker (Author), Joan Elias (Author), John Heim (Author) & 1 more Format: Kindle EditionAuthor: Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission, James Meeker, Joan Elias.

Plants Used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa—This book includes a brief description of each plant and its use, reproduced line drawings, and a map showing approximate location of each plant within the ceded territories. $ each. Plants Used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa: Meeker, James E., Elias, Joan E., Heim, John A.: Books - or: James E.

Meeker, Joan E. Elias, John A. Heim. The item Plants used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa, by James E. Meeker and Joan E. Elias and John A. Heim represents a specific, individual, material embodiment of a distinct intellectual or artistic creation found in University of Manitoba Libraries.

Rent or buy Plants Used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa -   More than 3, species of plants and animals inhabit the Great Lakes basin, as well, including plus species of fish.

Lake Huron is Author: Kim Ann Zimmermann. The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa, or Saulteaux are an Anishinaabe people of Canada and the northern Midwestern United are one of the most numerous indigenous peoples north of the Rio Canada, they are the second-largest First Nations population, surpassed only by the the United States, they have the fifth-largest population among Native.

great knowledge of plants has been achieved through long periods of time by a process of trial and error, basing this belief upon their fear of mushrooms.

Both men and women pointed out plants in their native habitat and were willing to explain their uses. They are the real ones to thank for the facts discovered and withoutFile Size: KB. Plants used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa. Odanah, Wisconsin: Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission; Arnason T, Hebda RJ, Johns T.

Use of plants for food and medicine by Native Peoples of eastern Canada. Can J Bot. ; 59 (11)– doi: /b Dickason OP, McNab by: The Ojibwa (oh-jib'-way) are a tribe of Algonquian speaking Indians from the upper Great Lakes.

The name Ojibwa is used most commonly in the United States and the name Chippewa is used in Canada. When the Ojibwa were first encountered in the s, their small bands lived in tiny, self-governing villages without tribal organization. The Great Lakes (French: les Grands-Lacs), also called the Laurentian Great Lakes and the Great Lakes of North America, are a series of interconnected freshwater lakes primarily in the upper mid-east region of North America, on the Canada–United States border, which connect to the Atlantic Ocean through the Saint Lawrence consist of Lakes Superior, Michigan, Source: EPA.

Traditional tobacco is a medicine, which can be used in a prescribed way to promote physical, spiritual, emotional, and community well-being. It may be used as an offering to the Creator or to another person, place, or being. A gift of traditional tobacco is a sign of respect and may be offered when asking for help, guidance, or protection.

Meeker, James E., Joan E. Elias and John A. Heim. Plants Used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa. Odanah, WI: Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission, This book contains a variety of information on species of plants used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa.

Miles, Charles. Indian and Eskimo Artifacts of North America. Chicago, IL: Henry Regnery. Plants Used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa 1 Introduction Aquatic plants form the foundation of healthy and flourishing lake ecosystems—both within lakes and rivers and on the shores around them.

They protect water quality while also producing life-supporting oxygen. Aquatic plants filter lake water, absorbing. The Ojibwa knowledge of medicinal plants has long been a subject of great attention and it has therefore contributed a lot to the ethnobotany literature of the Central boreal region [47, 84–89].

Some of these studies were reviewed and compiled by Meeker et al. [ 19 ] who provided detailed information about plants used by the Ojibwa ii. The Museum Gift Shop offers a wealth of nature related gifts, books, souvenirs, educational toys, apparel, posters and much more.

You can shop responsibly knowing that the store proceeds help fund exhibits, programming and research at the UWSP Museum of Natural History.

traditonal ojibway resources in the western great lakes an ethnographic inventory in the states of michigan, minnesota, and wisconsin final reportFile Size: 6MB.The Chippewa, also known as the Ojibway, Ojibwe, and Anishinaabe, are one of the largest and most powerful nations in North America, having nearly different bands throughout their original homeland in the northern United States — primarily Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan; and southern Canada — especially Ontario, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan.Plants Used by the Great Lakes Ojibwa by James E.

Meeker, Joan E. Elias, John A. Heim Paperback, Published ISBN / ISBN / Need it Fast? 2 day shipping options This book includes a brief description of the plant and it's use, a reproduced line drawing, and a m.